Home Forums Questions Browning on bottom of pizza crust

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  stevocon 6 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #221

    jeegyar
    Member

    So, I made a couple varieties of the pizzas in my sister’s gas oven. I followed the directions exactly, even measured the distance of the stone from the broiler and preheated exactly as long as the book said to. When I started cooking my pizzas, I realized that even though it was a gas oven, the broiler mechanism was turning on and off like it would in an electric oven. I ended up broiling my pizzas longer (which was fine) to get the color on top that I was seeking. I realized though that although the tops of the pizzas were bubbling and the edges were amazingly crusty and delicious, the bottoms of the pizzas had no color to speak of.

    I’m not sure if the gas oven was behaving more like an electric oven (it has convection options) and perhaps just had not heated the stone consistently enough before starting, or if the stone was losing heat in between pizzas as well (I was told that the first pizza had a bit better texture, but I didn’t get to try that one so I’m not sure), especially since the broiler kept turning on and off. Also, the stone was a bit on the thin side, but the same thickness as the other ones we have, only about 1/4 inch thick.

    There are so many variables, that I’m not 100% sure which aspect may have caused the not-charred bottom crust on the pizzas. Do you think the oven should have been treated more like an electric oven since the heating mechanism would turn on and off? Was the stone losing heat between pizzas? Should I have waited longer between each pizza to allow it to heat back up (maybe switch it back to bake to heat in between and then to broiler to cook)? Is the stone just too thin to hold the heat long enough and should I invest in a more expensive professional grade stone? I’ve never had a problem with the stone cooking pizzas the conventional way, for longer times at bake. I don’t have an infrared thermometer or else I’d use it to check the pizza stone’s temp before and between cooking the pizzas :( The best I can do is guess…

    #224

    DNoelH
    Member

    I had the same experience as jeegyar. I also got out a measuring tape and had the stone eight inches from the broiler. Then I tried moving the stone (my stone is just over 1/2 inch) one level closer. The broiler kept turning on and off. I also tried using the convection bake and broiler. I have made many pizzas at home and although I didn’t get the heat I think I needed to have a more perfectly cooked crust, the broiler did give me a charred top that had always alluded before. So thank you to Jim lahey for that baking tip. I think I got the best result possible from my oven. So a better oven is what I need. I will build myself a out door wood fired oven some day.

    #229

    jeegyar
    Member

    Got some answers!! Next time I will invest in a thicker pizza stone and try putting it even closer to the top just to make sure it gets as hot as possible. Hopefully this will lower my margin of error :)

    #230

    paula
    Member

    I tried making this pizza this morning using an upside down cookie sheet. I saw these directions in a Bon Appetit magazine article about the book, My Pizza. I have always had great luck with the no-knead bread so I was excited to try the pizza. The dough was easy to make and shape, but when I tried to remove it from the cookie sheet, it just fell apart. The bottom crust was not done at all even though the top was well done. It tasted delicious, though. I was disappointed to hear that people had a problem with underdone crust when using a pizza stone also. I did buy a stone today and am going to try again tomorrow. Any tips would be appreciated.

    #231

    jeegyar
    Member

    Paula, you won’t get the same results using Jim’s method using a cookie sheet because it won’t retain heat the same way the pizza stone will. Definitely try it with a pizza stone. A thicker stone will retain heat better (I’m planning on investing in a better quality one soon).

    #232

    paula
    Member

    OK, so I tried the pizza again using a pizza stone. I heated it up for 30 minutes at 500 then on broil for 10 minutes. The pizza came out good, but I thought the bottom crust was still a little pale so I put the pizza directly on the rack below the one that held the pizza stone to brown it up a little. Really good! This is also good if you want to serve more than one pizza at once. You can keep your pies hot and crisp up the bottom at he same time. Next time, I think I will heat the pizza stone up for one hour.

    #233

    There are some great solutions here! I recently answered this question for Victoria from the blog, Mission: Food. You can check out her pizza post at http://www.mission-food.com/2012/03/my-pizza-delicious-new-way-to-make.html.

    WHY IS MY BOTTOM CRUST NOT BROWNING?
    The thickness of the stone, distance of the stone from the broiler and the overall cooking time can affect the quality of the bottom crust. I’d recommend moving the oven rack closer to the broiler and making sure that you use a thick pizza stone.

    #245

    stevocon
    Member

    Another trick is to precook the dough for a few minutes without anything on it then take it out and make your toppings and re-fire it.

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